Things That Are Cheaper Than Myki

Things That Are Cheaper Than Myki.

Myki mouse

This is pretty well researched and therefore quite depressing when you think about it.

Myki has cost about 1.5 billion australian dollars. That’s 15 with 8 zeros after it, otherwise defined as:

$1500,000,000

The article lists things which are cheaper than Myki, including the space shuttle launch, Curiosity rover, currently on Mars, and the entire assets of the Victoria Police.

The decision of government in this instance, to throw good money after bad logically has to stop somewhere.

Then again…

Author: gotheek

Sometime writer, full time human.

1 thought on “Things That Are Cheaper Than Myki”

  1. It would be interesting to know what Perth and Brisbane paid for their travel smartcard systems? Having seen many of the smartcard systems in use in the world I’m surprised that Melbourne didn’t buy an existing “tried and tested” system off the shelf, rather than reinventing the wheel. Some stored value systems have been around for 20 years.

    The author is to be congratulated in so succinctly collating all the comparable costs of projects to myki. I’ve had a few letters to The Age and the Herald Sun published over the years where I’ve raised the comparative cost of myki to individual major projects around the world, but putting it all together in tabular form is great. As I’ve previously said in one such letter, London’s Oyster card works for 9 travel zones and on 5 different modes of transport (overground, underground, docklands light railway, buses, and the Croydon trams). Melbourne had to change its tram zones as myki couldn’t cope with just 2 zones!

    Did we really need consultants to be paid (reportedly) a quarter of a million dollars to come up with the name myki. Many of the global smartcard systems already have “my… ” as a part of their name (such as Myticket, Mytravel, Myway etc) If the consultant’s fee was correct then a cool quarter of a million for two letters ‘ki’ is a bit rich!. Incidentally the word myki in the old Norse language means (in polite English terms) the solid by-products excreted by an animal. Probably accurately describes Victoria’s myki system as it currently stands!

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